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HRC Fertility Pasadena

The following area consists of relevant news and events as well as informative material and stories by the staff at HRC Pasadena.

HRC Pasadena Recognized By Forbes

GREAT NEWS!! HRC Pasadena is honored to be named in a Forbes.com article as one of the busiest IVF centers in the country!! (according to the Centers for Disease Control)

We appreciate being recognized for our longevity (treating patients since 1988!), high success rates and latest advancements.

While we are kept busy helping wonderful patients realize their dreams of becoming parents, we are always available to work with new patients like you!

Click here to read why patients come to HRC from all over the world to see Doctors Kolb, Nelson and Wilcox.

 

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Infertility Etiquette

The National Infertility Association (Resolve.org) recently wrote an outstanding article discussing what it is like to be going through infertility issues and how we should treat our friends and loved ones who are having trouble conceiving.  We would like to share this article below.  For more information about The National Infertility Association and to view the article on the Resolve website, please click here.

Chances are, you know someone who is struggling with infertility. More than seven million people of childbearing age in the United States experience infertility. Yet, as a society, we are woefully uninformed about how to best provide emotional support for our loved ones during this painful time.

Infertility is, indeed, a very painful struggle. The pain is similar to the grief over losing a loved one, but it is unique because it is a recurring grief. Infertile people grieve the loss of the baby that they may never know. They grieve the loss of that baby who would have had mommy's nose and daddy's eyes. But, each month, there is the hope that maybe that baby will be conceived after all. No matter how hard they try to prepare themselves for bad news, they still hope that this month will be different. Then, the bad news comes again, and the grief washes over the infertile couple anew. This process happens month after month, year after year. It is like having a deep cut that keeps getting opened right when it starts to heal.

As the couple moves into infertility treatments, the pain increases while the bank account depletes. The tests are invasive and embarrassing to both parties, and you feel like the doctor has taken over your bedroom. And for all of this discomfort, you pay a lot of money.

A couple will eventually resolve the infertility problem in one of three ways:

  • They will eventually conceive a baby.
  • They will stop the infertility treatments and choose to live without children.
  • They will find an alternative way to parent, such as by adopting a child or becoming a foster parent.

Reaching a resolution can take years, so your infertile loved ones need your emotional support during this journey. Most people don't know what to say, so they wind up saying the wrong thing, which only makes the journey so much harder for their loved ones. Knowing what not to say is half of the battle to providing support.

Don't Tell Them to Relax

Everyone knows someone who had trouble conceiving but then finally became pregnant once she "relaxed." Couples who are able to conceive after a few months of "relaxing" are not infertile. By definition, a couple is not diagnosed as "infertile" until they have tried unsuccessfully to become pregnant for a full year. In fact, most infertility specialists will not treat a couple for infertility until they have tried to become pregnant for a year. This year weeds out the people who aren't infertile but just need to "relax." Those that remain are truly infertile.

Comments such as "just relax" or "try going on a cruise" create even more stress for the infertile couple, particularly the woman. The woman feels like she is doing something wrong when, in fact, there is a good chance that there is a physical problem preventing her from becoming pregnant.

These comments can also reach the point of absurdity. As a couple, my husband and I underwent two surgeries, numerous inseminations, hormone treatments, and four years of poking and prodding by doctors. Yet, people still continued to say things like, "If you just relaxed on a cruise . . ." Infertility is a diagnosable medical problem that must be treated by a doctor, and even with treatment, many couples will NEVER successfully conceive a child. Relaxation itself does not cure medical infertility.

Don't Minimize the Problem

Failure to conceive a baby is a very painful journey. Infertile couples are surrounded by families with children. These couples watch their friends give birth to two or three children, and they watch those children grow while the couple goes home to the silence of an empty house. These couples see all of the joy that a child brings into someone's life, and they feel the emptiness of not being able to experience the same joy.

Comments like, "Just enjoy being able to sleep late . . . .travel . . etc.," do not offer comfort. Instead, these comments make infertile people feel like you are minimizing their pain. You wouldn't tell somebody whose parent just died to be thankful that he no longer has to buy Father's Day or Mother's Day cards. Losing that one obligation doesn't even begin to compensate for the incredible loss of losing a parent. In the same vein, being able to sleep late or travel does not provide comfort to somebody who desperately wants a child.

Don't Say There Are Worse Things That Could Happen

Along the same lines, don't tell your friend that there are worse things that she could be going through. Who is the final authority on what is the "worst" thing that could happen to someone? Is it going through a divorce? Watching a loved one die? Getting raped? Losing a job?

Different people react to different life experiences in different ways. To someone who has trained his whole life for the Olympics, the "worst" thing might be experiencing an injury the week before the event. To someone who has walked away from her career to become a stay-at-home wife for 40 years, watching her husband leave her for a younger woman might be the "worst" thing. And, to a woman whose sole goal in life has been to love and nurture a child, infertility may indeed be the "worst" thing that could happen.

People wouldn't dream of telling someone whose parent just died, "It could be worse: both of your parents could be dead." Such a comment would be considered cruel rather than comforting. In the same vein, don't tell your friend that she could be going through worse things than infertility.

Don't Say They Aren't Meant to Be Parents

One of the cruelest things anyone ever said to me is, "Maybe God doesn't intend for you to be a mother." How incredibly insensitive to imply that I would be such a bad mother that God felt the need to divinely sterilize me. If God were in the business of divinely sterilizing women, don't you think he would prevent the pregnancies that end in abortions? Or wouldn't he sterilize the women who wind up neglecting and abusing their children? Even if you aren't religious, the "maybe it's not meant to be" comments are not comforting. Infertility is a medical condition, not a punishment from God or Mother Nature.

Don't Ask Why They Aren't Trying IVF

In vitro fertilization (IVF) is a method in which the woman harvests multiple eggs, which are then combined with the man's sperm in a petri dish. This is a method that can produce multiple births. People frequently ask, "Why don't you just try IVF?" in the same casual tone they would use to ask, "Why don't you try shopping at another store?"

Don't Be Crude

It is appalling that I even have to include this paragraph, but some of you need to hear this-Don't make crude jokes about your friend's vulnerable position. Crude comments like "I'll donate the sperm" or "Make sure the doctor uses your sperm for the insemination" are not funny, and they only irritate your friends.

Don't Complain About Your Pregnancy

This message is for pregnant women-Just being around you is painful for your infertile friends. Seeing your belly grow is a constant reminder of what your infertile friend cannot have. Unless an infertile women plans to spend her life in a cave, she has to find a way to interact with pregnant women. However, there are things you can do as her friend to make it easier.

The number one rule is DON'T COMPLAIN ABOUT YOUR PREGNANCY. I understand from my friends that, when you are pregnant, your hormones are going crazy and you experience a lot of discomfort, such as queasiness, stretch marks, and fatigue. You have every right to vent about the discomforts to any one else in your life, but don't put your infertile friend in the position of comforting you.

Your infertile friend would give anything to experience the discomforts you are enduring because those discomforts come from a baby growing inside of you. When I heard a pregnant woman complain about morning sickness, I would think, "I'd gladly throw up for nine straight months if it meant I could have a baby." When a pregnant woman would complain about her weight gain, I would think, "I would cut off my arm if I could be in your shoes."

I managed to go to baby showers and hospitals to welcome my friends' new babies, but it was hard. Without exception, it was hard. Stay sensitive to your infertile friend's emotions, and give her the leeway that she needs to be happy for you while she cries for herself. If she can't bring herself to hold your new baby, give her time. She isn't rejecting you or your new baby; she is just trying to work her way through her pain to show sincere joy for you. The fact that she is willing to endure such pain in order to celebrate your new baby with you speaks volumes about how much your friendship means to her.

Don't Treat Them Like They Are Ignorant

For some reason, some people seem to think that infertility causes a person to become unrealistic about the responsibilities of parenthood. I don't follow the logic, but several people told me that I wouldn't ache for a baby so much if I appreciated how much responsibility was involved in parenting.

Let's face it-no one can fully appreciate the responsibilities involved in parenting until they are, themselves, parents. That is true whether you successfully conceived after one month or after 10 years. The length of time you spend waiting for that baby does not factor in to your appreciation of responsibility. If anything, people who have been trying to become pregnant longer have had more time to think about those responsibilities. They have also probably been around lots of babies as their friends started their families.

Perhaps part of what fuels this perception is that infertile couples have a longer time to "dream" about what being a parent will be like. Like every other couple, we have our fantasies-my child will sleep through the night, would never have a tantrum in public, and will always eat his vegetables. Let us have our fantasies. Those fantasies are some of the few parent-to-be perks that we have-let us have them. You can give us your knowing looks when we discover the truth later.

Don't Gossip About Your Friend's Condition

Infertility treatments are very private and embarrassing, which is why many couples choose to undergo these treatments in secret. Men especially are very sensitive to letting people know about infertility testing, such as sperm counts. Gossiping about infertility is not usually done in a malicious manner. The gossipers are usually well-meaning people who are only trying to find out more about infertility so they can help their loved ones.

Regardless of why you are sharing this information with someone else, it hurts and embarrasses your friend to find out that Madge the bank teller knows what your husband's sperm count is and when your next period is expected. Infertility is something that should be kept as private as your friend wants to keep it. Respect your friend's privacy, and don't share any information that your friend hasn't authorized.

Don't Push Adoption (Yet)

Adoption is a wonderful way for infertile people to become parents. (As an adoptive parent, I can fully vouch for this!!) However, the couple needs to work through many issues before they will be ready to make an adoption decision. Before they can make the decision to love a "stranger's baby," they must first grieve the loss of that baby with Daddy's eyes and Mommy's nose. Adoption social workers recognize the importance of the grieving process. When my husband and I went for our initial adoption interview, we expected the first question to be, "Why do you want to adopt a baby?" Instead, the question was, "Have you grieved the loss of your biological child yet?" Our social worker emphasized how important it is to shut one door before you open another.

You do, indeed, need to grieve this loss before you are ready to start the adoption process. The adoption process is very long and expensive, and it is not an easy road. So, the couple needs to be very sure that they can let go of the hope of a biological child and that they can love an adopted baby. This takes time, and some couples are never able to reach this point. If your friend cannot love a baby that isn't her "own," then adoption isn't the right decision for her, and it is certainly not what is best for the baby.

Mentioning adoption in passing can be a comfort to some couples. (The only words that ever offered me comfort were from my sister, who said, "Whether through pregnancy or adoption, you will be a mother one day.") However, "pushing" the issue can frustrate your friend. So, mention the idea in passing if it seems appropriate, and then drop it. When your friend is ready to talk about adoption, she will raise the issue herself.

So, what can you say to your infertile friends? Unless you say "I am giving you this baby," there is nothing you can say that will erase their pain. So, take that pressure off of yourself. It isn't your job to erase their pain, but there is a lot you can do to lessen the load. Here are a few ideas.

Let Them Know That You Care

The best thing you can do is let your infertile friends know that you care. Send them cards. Let them cry on your shoulder. If they are religious, let them know you are praying for them. Offer the same support you would offer a friend who has lost a loved one. Just knowing they can count on you to be there for them lightens the load and lets them know that they aren't going through this alone.

Remember Them on Mother's Day

With all of the activity on Mother's Day, people tend to forget about women who cannot become mothers. Mother's Day is an incredibly painful time for infertile women. You cannot get away from it-There are ads on the TV, posters at the stores, church sermons devoted to celebrating motherhood, and all of the plans for celebrating with your own mother and mother-in-law.

Mother's Day is an important celebration and one that I relish now that I am a mother. However, it was very painful while I was waiting for my baby. Remember your infertile friends on Mother's Day, and send them a card to let them know you are thinking of them. They will appreciate knowing that you haven't "forgotten" them.

Support Their Decision to Stop Treatments

No couple can endure infertility treatments forever. At some point, they will stop. This is an agonizing decision to make, and it involves even more grief. Even if the couple chooses to adopt a baby, they must still first grieve the loss of that baby who would have had mommy's nose and daddy's eyes.

Once the couple has made the decision to stop treatments, support their decision. Don't encourage them to try again, and don't discourage them from adopting, if that is their choice. Once the couple has reached resolution (whether to live without children, adopt a child, or become foster parents), they can finally put that chapter of their lives behind them. Don't try to open that chapter again.

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Help! I’m Being Overrun with Hormones – Hers!

sad coupleHello, and happy National Infertility Awareness Week. In recent years, the hard work of many people, including those coping infertility, organizations who support those living with infertility such as Resolve.org and medical professionals who provide interventions to fight infertility, such as HRC Fertility – Pasadena/Rancho Cucamonga, have brought much needed help to those struggling to conceive. These efforts need to be applauded as so many people have received hope and resolution to their infertility as a result. Although more progress is needed in regards to supporting all those who face the disease of infertility, there is one population who remains significantly underserved in this arena and they are we guys - the men who so want to be a father, yet are not able to be due to either their own infertility issues and/or that of their partner. If this is you or the man you love, I am here to tell you that the desire to be a parent is a man’s world too! 

You do not need to look any further than the animal kingdom to know that the instinct to be a father is as natural as it gets. Lions, wolves, rams and elephants (to name few) fight in order to have their bloodlines continue. If you and your partner are challenged with infertility you may not need to fight in that same way; however, it is a battle nonetheless. Rest assured that your desire to be a father is as natural as anything on the planet. 

Speaking of the “fight,” one of my main goals in providing counseling services to men and their partners who are battling infertility is to help you fight the disease and not one another. One of the common struggles that I hear men say is: “I’m being overrun by her hormones!” The following are a few strategies for coping with her hormones and the emotions they may bring. 

Do not take it personally. When in the course of your infertility journey that your wife/girlfriend/partner is prescribed infertility medications, it possible that her hormones will be impacted, leading to a heightened range, depth and irrationality in her emotions. Remember, most likely this has nothing to do with you. It is the drugs talking (along with her own heart-break and frustration in dealing with infertility.) Your job in these situations is to be comforting and supportive. Focus on how to best do so. 

Be empathetic and understanding. Remember this hard on her too. Plus she’s the one taking all those medications. Although the mediations are hopefully helping the infertility issues, they are also wreaking havoc in her body so to speak. Odds are that she likely doesn’t like being so emotional and that it is no piece of cake for her either. 

Ask how to support her. At times it may seem like everything you do in an effort to understand and be comforting is the wrong thing. This can be beyond frustrating. However, the best way to know how to support your partner is to ask and have her make it explicit. But here is a little tip: often the best time to ask is not in the heat of the moment, but rather when she (and you) is not so emotional. At that point you both will be able to think about and communicate your needs rationally. And yes, it is okay to tell her how the tense moments affect you, just be sure to use “I” statements in regards to how you feel about certain things, and not play the blame game. It is also a good idea to have a debrief session after an emotional time (once you both are calm) or after a procedure or an injection, etc. to check in with her to ensure that you both support one another in positive ways.

Take care of yourself. This should be an essential component throughout your infertility journey, but especially when your emotions are being taxed. Do whatever you like to do to recharge your batteries. Be it sports, cars, art, cooking, a hobby or whatever; make time for it. In addition, I highly recommend that you make a part of your self-care something that is health/exercise related. The stress relief, the endorphins release, the emotional decrease and the overall health benefits will make you feel better. 

In the end, remember that the two of you are in this together, even though you have different roles to play. Figuring out how to best support one another is one of the greatest gifts you can give to each other at this time. Also remember, “this too will pass.” She will not always be taking infertility medications and her doing so now, along with all the interventions you are doing, is a part of your “fight” for fatherhood. When that happens, it will all be worth it and you will feel like the king of the jungle.

About the Author:

Fred Harlan, MA, MA, MFTI is a resourceful Marriage and Family Therapist Intern (IMF 74125), who specializes in helping men cope with infertility, be it their issue or that of their partner, and with couples who seek to strengthen their relationship. Fred experienced the challenges of infertility firsthand as he and his wife struggled through eight years of infertility before becoming parents.

Fred is an expert in communication and interpersonal relationships. He is a skilled educator and speaker having taught and spoke in university, professional and community settings. He holds masters degrees in Clinical Psychology and Speech Communication, and a BA in Theatre. 

Fred works in private practice in Thousand Oaks, CA. He enjoys sports, the arts, and most of all, and doing anything with his wife and son. 

 

Hello, and happy National Infertility Awareness Week. In recent years, the hard work of many people, including those coping infertility, organizations who support those living with infertility such as Resolve.org and medical professionals who provide interventions to fight infertility, such as HRC Fertility – Pasadena/Rancho Cucamonga, have brought much needed help to those struggling to conceive. These efforts need to be applauded as so many people have received hope and resolution to their infertility as a result. Although more progress is needed in regards to supporting all those who face the disease of infertility, there is one population who remains significantly underserved in this arena and they are we guys - the men who so want to be a father, yet are not able to be due to either their own infertility issues and/or that of their partner. If this is you or the man you love, I am here to tell you that the desire to be a parent is a man’s world too!

You do not need to look any further than the animal kingdom to know that the instinct to be a father is as natural as it gets. Lions, wolves, rams and elephants (to name few) fight in order to have their bloodlines continue. If you and your partner are challenged with infertility you may not need to fight in that same way; however, it is a battle nonetheless. Rest assured that your desire to be a father is as natural as anything on the planet.

Speaking of the “fight,” one of my main goals in providing counseling services to men and their partners who are battling infertility is to help you fight the disease and not one another. One of the common struggles that I hear men say is: “I’m being overrun by her hormones!” The following are a few strategies for coping with her hormones and the emotions they may bring.

Do not take it personally. When in the course of your infertility journey that your wife/girlfriend/partner is prescribed infertility medications, it possible that her hormones will be impacted, leading to a heightened range, depth and irrationality in her emotions. Remember, most likely this has nothing to do with you. It is the drugs talking (along with her own heart-break and frustration in dealing with infertility.) Your job in these situations is to be comforting and supportive. Focus on how to best do so.

 

Be empathetic and understanding. Remember this hard on her too. Plus she’s the one taking all those medications. Although the mediations are hopefully helping the infertility issues, they are also wreaking havoc in her body so to speak. Odds are that she likely doesn’t like being so emotional and that it is no piece of cake for her either.

 

Ask how to support her. At times it may seem like everything you do in an effort to understand and be comforting is the wrong thing. This can be beyond frustrating. However, the best way to know how to support your partner is to ask and have her make it explicit. But here is a little tip: often the best time to ask is not in the heat of the moment, but rather when she (and you) is not so emotional. At that point you both will be able to think about and communicate your needs rationally. And yes, it is okay to tell her how the tense moments affect you, just be sure to use “I” statements in regards to how you feel about certain things, and not play the blame game. It is also a good idea to have a debrief session after an emotional time (once you both are calm) or after a procedure or an injection, etc. to check in with her to ensure that you both support one another in positive ways.

Take care of yourself. This should be an essential component throughout your infertility journey, but especially when your emotions are being taxed. Do whatever you like to do to recharge your batteries. Be it sports, cars, art, cooking, a hobby or whatever; make time for it. In addition, I highly recommend that you make a part of your self-care something that is health/exercise related. The stress relief, the endorphins release, the emotional decrease and the overall health benefits will make you feel better.

In the end, remember that the two of you are in this together, even though you have different roles to play. Figuring out how to best support one another is one of the greatest gifts you can give to each other at this time. Also remember, “this too will pass.” She will not always be taking infertility medications and her doing so now, along with all the interventions you are doing, is a part of your “fight” for fatherhood. When that happens, it will all be worth it and you will feel like the king of the jungle.

About the Author:

Fred Harlan, MA, MA, MFTI is a resourceful Marriage and Family Therapist Intern (IMF 74125), who specializes in helping men cope with infertility, be it their issue or that of their partner, and with couples who seek to strengthen their relationship. Fred experienced the challenges of infertility firsthand as he and his wife struggled through eight years of infertility before becoming parents.

Fred is an expert in communication and interpersonal relationships. He is a skilled educator and speaker having taught and spoke in university, professional and community settings. He holds masters degrees in Clinical Psychology and Speech Communication, and a BA in Theatre.

Fred works in private practice in Thousand Oaks, CA. He enjoys sports, the arts, and most of all, and doing anything with his wife and son. 

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2016 HRC Fertility Pasadena Free Seminar Dates Announced

We are pleased to announce that the "Free Infertility Seminars" will once again be given by the doctors and staff at HRC Fertility Pasadena in 2016!

The upcoming 2016 dates are displayed below:

>> January 21, 2016
>> February 17, 2016
>> March 9, 2016
>> April 13, 2016
>> May 11, 2016
>> June 8, 2016
>> July 13, 2016
>> August 17, 2016
>> September 14, 2016
>> October 12, 2016
>> November 9, 2016

All seminars are free to attend and are from 6:30 to 8:00 pm

To sign up for one of the seminars, please click here to fill out our online sign-up form.

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The Art of Babies

Vitrification technology puts birth on your life schedule
By EDDIE RIVERA, Pasadena Now Community Editor

Egg Freezing / Vitrification - HRC Fertility PasadenaIs there anything more important or life-changing than motherhood? Can one ever put a price on a tiny pair of eyes looking up at their mother? Or watching a baby’s first smile?

But what happens when life gets in the way? What are the choices when a mother’s health is suddenly threatened by a a debilitating disease? Is that chance for motherhood, or a new life, gone as well? When a young fertile woman in her 20s or 30s has been unable to find a suitable partner, what happens then?

For decades, fertility specialists have worked at perfecting the art of freezing eggs and sperm to create a new life, when it seems like time and circumstance might not come together at the precise moment.

Pasadena Living recently interviewed Dr. Jeffrey Nelson of HRC Fertility Pasadena about Vitrification and the importance of freezing and saving fertile eggs for just the right moment in a woman’s life.

Please click here read the complete article and interview with Dr. Nelson on the Pasadena Now website.

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Does a Reduced hCG Trigger Dose Compromise Outcomes in a Large Prospective Trial of Vaginal Progesterone for Luteal Phase Support?

Dr. Bradford Kolb of HRC Fertility located in Pasadena, California assisted in the following infertility trial. Click here or on the image below to view the trial in a larger format in .pdf format.

Reduced hGC Trial

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Employee Plans to Include Egg Freezing and Storage

This week APPLE and FACEBOOK made news that offers hope to women everywhere. The tech giants will cover egg freezing (up to $20,000), as part of their employees’ healthcare packages. (FACBEOOK has already added this benefit and APPLE will begin to do so in January 2015). Here at HRC Pasadena we are thrilled with this development and applaud this progressive policy change.

While both APPLE and FACEBOOK have not made many comments to the press since their initial announcement, APPLE did send the following to ABC NEWS.

"We want to empower women at Apple to do the best work of their lives as they care for loved ones and raise their families," the company said in a statement to ABC News. "We continue to expand our benefits for women, with a new extended maternity leave policy, along with cryopreservation and egg storage as part of our extensive support for infertility treatments."

What exactly is Egg Freezing (Cryopreservation)?

Fertility preservation (egg freezing) allows women to delay childbearing by using some of the same technologies perfected with IVF.  It prevents eggs from aging which helps minimize the loss of fertility that often occurs as women get older. HRC Fertility’s research has helped make egg freezing a safe and viable option for women looking to safeguard their reproductive options. Egg freezing is also beneficial for women who are about to undergo therapies that will destroy their ovaries such as chemotherapy or radiation.  In this video, Dr. Wilcox talks about the process of egg freezing and explains why the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) no longer classifies it as merely experimental.

There is no doubt that egg freezing can change lives. Women who are not  “ready” to have a baby can now preserve their fertility until the timing is right. It also allows women to pursue careers or advanced degrees which often require long, intense hours, without sacrificing their fertility.

WHAT IS COMING UP NEXT?

It has been purported in the press that APPLE and FACEBOOK have opened up the door to many more companies following suit. With major insurance companies now reviewing their company offerings as open enrollment for health care is just weeks away.

This month, medical staff from all over the world traveled to Hawaii for the annual ASRM conference. Much was learned about healthcare inclusion of fertility procedures. Please feel free to ask our financial counselors to help you work with your healthcare provider or determine if other financial options are available to you.

For additional billing or financial related questions, please call us at (626) 440-9161 extension 359 or email us at .

The decision to preserve fertility via egg freezing is a personal choice and here at HRC Fertility of Pasadena.we offer more information on this procedure here.

Also, we offer extensive information regarding other fertility procedures.

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HRC Fertility Pasadena now on INSTAGRAM, YouTUBE and TRIBERR

HRC Fertility Pasadena is on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram and Triberr

 

HRC PASADENA has taken even more leaps in to social media by extending our social media presence!  You can find us NOW on INSTAGRAM, YouTUBE and TRIBERR!  There we share even more content from our photo and video galleries and help educate a wider audience about infertility.

How YOU can connect with our new social media sites:

INSTAGRAM: we would love for you to follow us at: http://instagram.com/p/rfVWVexYrR/

YouTube: please subscribe here:  http://www.youtube.com/user/HRCPasadena 

TRIBERR: Read the posts on TRIBERR if you are a member or follow us when the content appears regularly on TWITTER.  We TWEET as @HRCPasadena.  If you are on TRIBERR join our brand new TRIBE!  We are Journey in to Parenthood! (http://triberr.com/pages/tribe-overview.php?tid=55127)

Find us here, too!

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HRC Pasadena Physicians Kolb, Nelson and Wilcox Receive "Top Docs" Award for 2014

Pasadena Magazine - 2014 Top Doctors AwardHRC Pasadena is proud to announce that Dr. Bradford Kolb, Dr. Jeffrey Nelson, and Dr. John Wilcox all have been once again awarded "Top Doctors" by Pasadena Magazine.  To view the articles, please click on the links below:

Dr. Bradford Kolb - 2014 Pasadena Magazine "Top Doctors" award winner

 

Dr. Jeffrey Nelson - 2014 Pasadena Magazine "Top Doctors" award winner

 

Dr. John Wilcox - 2014 Pasadena Magazine "Top Doctors" award winner

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HRC Pasadena Receives Optum® Center Of Excellence Designation

HRC Pasadena Receives Optum® Center Of Excellence Designation

2014 COE Certificate HRC Fertility Pasadena sm

Designation Recognizes Center’s Excellence in the Care of Patients Managing Infertility

Pasadena, California, (06, 20, 2014) – HRC Fertility Pasadena today announced it has been named a Center of Excellence (COE) for its infertility program by health services leader, Optum. A COE designation is given to those medical practices combining top-quality clinical care with excellent patient support. COE networks provide members with access to high quality medical centers for infertility treatment that consistently deliver safe, evidenced-based care.

“We selected HRC Fertility Pasadena because it represents high standards of care in helping people manage infertility,” said Alexander Dlugi, M.D., Optum National Medical Director, Infertility. “We commend HRC Fertility Pasadena for its excellence in providing this level of quality in the care of patients.”

“We are grateful to have received this designation as it reflects Optum’s support of our mission to provide quality care that is accessible to people facing infertility issues while also highlighting our joint commitment to help people live their lives to the fullest,” said Jackie Sharpe.

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Free Infertility Seminars

Each month HRC Pasadena has been proud to sponsor a free Fertility 101 seminar.  This is a great opportunity to meet one of our doctors and to ask questions.  All attendees to the seminars will receive a FREE new-patient consultation.  And that’s not all! All attendees will also be entered into a raffle and the winner will receive a $1000 discount voucher for fertility treatment at HRC.

All seminars are on Wednesday evenings from 6:30 to 8:00 pm and are at our Pasadena office location.

Please RSVP on our seminar page for any of the following dates:

Wednesday November 12, 2014

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